Discover Mumbai’s rich heritage through walking tours

Here's why you should be happy about your trip to Mumbai. For a start, it's one of the most populous urban regions in the world. The sheer number of people you will encounter on its streets alone ought to make this trip a memorable one for you.

Then there's the fact that it is India's commercial and entertainment capital, attracting migrants from across the country to create what is a fabulous melting pot of language, culture and cuisine unlike any other city in India. If you think New York's Times Square is the 'Crossroads of the World', the variety this city has to offer may come as a pleasant surprise to you.

Did we mention its long and colourful history? Its inhabitation since the Stone Age, its unique position in the Maurya Empire founded in the third century BCE, the reference made to it by Greek geographer Ptolemy in 150 CE, its European rulers? There are signs everywhere, provided you know where to look. This is where we come in. Let us hold you by the hand while you take a deep breath. Mumbai awaits. Plunge in.

Dive into Mumbai

Take the adventure on the road with this handy, printable guide:

Walking tours across India

go pub-hopping in colaba

Mumbai, Eat & Drink

6 stops, Medium

There are places where one can drink and places where one can drink well. Colaba very clearly belongs to the latter category. It crams in so many establishments, so much history, and so many great

the arts walking tour

Mumbai, History

9 stops, Medium

All major cities have fascinating hidden sides that they choose to reveal at random. If you're lucky, Mumbai will allow you a couple of those picture-perfect moments when you least expect it

the british in mumbai walking tour

Mumbai, History

4 stops, Medium

They came, they conquered, they left a lasting influence. If it weren't for the presence of the British on these seven islands, it's hard to say what the face of Mumbai would be

Guest Tours

Presented by:Girish Shahane

the arts walking tour

Mumbai, History

9 stops, Medium

All major cities have fascinating hidden sides that they choose to reveal at random. If you’re lucky, Mumbai will allow you a couple of those picture-perfect moments when you least expect it

Presented by:Tariq Ansari

the british in mumbai walking tour

Mumbai, History

4 stops, Medium

They came, they conquered, they left a lasting influence. If it weren’t for the presence of the British on these seven islands, it’s hard to say what the face of Mumbai would be

Presented by:Sampurna Chattarji

the bazaar tour

Mumbai, History

7 stops, Medium

If there’s demand, chances are a market will spring up somewhere to meet it. That’s how things work in aamchi Mumbai, where everything from flowers and antiques to second-hand cars

Jumping now in Mumbai

If you've had a tough week, we suggest you treat yourself to a fabulous Sunday brunch. We strongly recommend one of these places for a great meal with a view, a few drinks and refreshing dip in the pool. Ah, Sunday!

An interview with writer Rupa Gulab

Guru Nanak Park,Bandra West

Columnist and writer Rupa Gulab published her first novel ‘Girl Alone’ in 2005. There has been no looking back since. We spoke to her about her work and where she draws inspiration from. True to her style, we ended up with interesting answers and also an explanation about why her Twitter bio describes her as a ‘hyper cola-junkie’.

Is writing something you always wanted to do, or did it just happen?
Rupa Gulab: Always, always, always!

What was the first piece you ever wrote?
RG: My first shot at fiction was a short story about a communist owl called Nostracious Nominovich. I wrote it to entertain my baby sisters when I was a teenager. The first article I ever wrote was published in The Times of India, soon after I was done with college. It was a little humour piece.

You have authored a couple of novels, a book of short stories, columns for newspapers and magazines. What did you enjoy doing most?
RG: I love writing columns most! I never fantasised about becoming an author; I've always wanted to be a columnist. The interesting thing is, my first serialised column in the magazine Cosmopolitan became my first book, 'Girl Alone'.

Your Twitter bio describes you as a 'Hyper cola-junkie.' What's that about?
RG: I'm ashamed to admit that I drink colas the way people drink water. Thums Up is my favourite brand; I will only grudgingly settle for Coke or Pepsi if Thums Up is not available. The sugar rush is what probably makes me hyper and irritable.

You have lived in Kolkata, Mumbai and Delhi. Which of these places do you identify with the most, and why?
RG: Mumbai. It's the most cosmopolitan city in India, and it lets you do your own thing. For starters, the neighbours aren't as nosey; people are way too busy getting on with their own lives. You don't have to frequent posh places to have great food and great fun. The honest truth is, the food at some of the grungier places is better.

What inspired your first novel 'Girl Alone'?
RG: This is a long story. 'Girl Alone' was a freelance project commissioned by a website called fridaycorporation.com. They wanted to serialise a dating diary. I wasn't willing, at first, but gave in when they showed me the first episode someone in the office had written. I had a giggling fit when I read it. It was obviously written by a man and was so ridiculously raunchy that I felt I had to write it to save women! I made them trash that piece and started afresh. I wrote about six episodes during my lunch breaks at office. For inspiration, I fell back on my early years in Mumbai — advertising and life at the hostel. Sadly, fridaycorporation.com shut down before anything was published. I was so into 'Girl Alone' by then, I wanted to see it to the end. So I went to Cosmopolitan, they bought the concept and it ran for two years.

Do you draw from real life experiences when you write?
RG: Sometimes.

Could you list some of your favourite spots in Delhi for a girls' night out?
RG: I never go out at night in Delhi if I can help it! But in Mumbai, Toto's is my go tospot to catch up with old friends.

Now, this is good use of an MBA degree. Professor Shivanand Mankekar, who is a professor of management at Jamnalal Bajaj Institute of Management Studies, was revealed to be holding 1.06% of shares in United Spirits Limited. The information came to the fore with global giant Diageo's bid to take over the company. Known among trading circles for his astute skills, the professor and his family also hold some valuable stocks in other units such as Reliance Mutual Funds and Talwalkar Better Value Fitness. Sources add that the family is keeping a low profile, while avoiding media contact. With the takeover on the verge of happening, this might prove just a bit more difficult.